#30in30 – What you see is what you get

(Reading time: 2 min read)

The context Effect relates to how our brain processes the information we perceive in our environment. It describes how when we are confronted with environmental influences we often include them subliminally in our decision making.

Applied to the process of jurisdiction the Context Effect affects juries and judges because in each of them the finder of the…

#30in30 – When Quantity beats Quality

(Reading time: 2 min read)

The 30 in 30 Briefing Series focuses on a new cognitive bias, fallacy or heuristic in every single publication. By this Briefing we want to provide you with a rough overview on the cognitive theories most likely to occur in the legal profession. Today’s content: The Illusory Truth Effect.

Repetition has always been used as a means to drive a point home so to say. Students have of course always known this but so have politicians, statesmen, propaganda promoters, the media, advertisers and authors. The illusory truth effect has numerous effects in the legal field as well.

Nudge News: Rational Decision-Making in the Era of Social Bots

(Reading time: 3 min read)

With discussions centered around the recent US presidential election or UK’s Brexit and with several upcoming national elections in Europe (the Netherlands and France in spring, followed by Germany later this year), the topic of social media influence on traditional media, politicians, and voters through the instrument of social bots has been continuously on the rise.

Confirmation Bias Affecting the Legal Profession

(Reading time: 3 min read)

“Although the phenomenon of confirmation bias would appear to be contrary to the notion that the legal profession requires, the application of an objective mind, the manner in which litigation – civil and criminal – is both conducted and adjudicated is closely aligned to a remarkable degree with this phenomenon.” – Hogan Lovells

#30in30 – Manipulated by your own Imagination

(Reading time: 3 min read)

The 30 in 30 Briefing Series focuses on a new cognitive bias, fallacy or heuristic in every single publication. By this Briefing we want to provide you with a rough overview on the cognitive theories most likely to occur in your legal or business profession. Today’s content: The Availability Heuristic.

Jurists: How to Outsmart Those Who are Outsmarting You

(Reading time: 5 min read)

Keith Stanovich discovered by testing rationality and unbiased decision-making that higher intelligence does not automatically lead to better decisions. People with high cognitive abilities are more likely to have a “bias blind spot”. It is harder for them to see their own errors.

Read this short essay on how you can start to outsmart your co-workers.